Posts Tagged ‘chinese’

Call for Papers: Chinese Documentary Panel at Rocky Mountain MLA

Friday, January 6th, 2012

The 2012 Rocky Mountain MLA will be held in picturesque Boulder, in the foothills of the Rocky Mountains, October 11-13.

Panel title: Recreating Reality: Contemporary Chinese Documentary Films

In recent years, documentary films have enjoyed unprecedented popularity with filmmakers from Taiwan, the PRC, and Hong Kong, who use their cameras to record and represent reality in their individual societies. This panel focuses on the themes, problematics, and/or techniques of documenting reality on the screen.

Please submit a proposal of no more than 250 words to Sylvia Lin (slin@nd.edu) by March 1, 2012. Notice of acceptance or rejection will be sent out on or before March 31, 2012.

Chair: Sylvia Li-chun Lin, University of Notre Dame Alternate Chair: Christopher Lupke, Washington State University (lupke@wsu.edu)

Shelly on Film: Fall Festival Report, Part Two: Under Safe Cover, a Fierce Debate

Wednesday, December 7th, 2011

By Shelly Kraicer

Shu Haolun's "No. 89 Shimen Road" won the top prize at CIFF, but wasn't shown on Awards Night.

The Nanjing-based China Independent Film Festival (28 October-1 November 2011), unlike the Beijing Independent Film Festival described previously, benefited from a substantial degree of official and semi-official “cover”. Unlike BIFF, there is a certain amount of practical compromise with official bodies and officially approved cinema: purity isn’t such an issue. Co-sponsors include the Nanjing University School of Journalism and Communication, The Communication University of China (Nanjing) and the RCM Museum of Modern Art. The second day of CIFF includes a forum attended by local propaganda department officials. A sidebar of the festival (nicknamed the “Longbiao Section” for the dragon-headed insignia that appears at the beginning of all officially approved film prints in China) included screenings in a luxurious commercial cinema of several films that that are strictly speaking non-independent (i.e. censor-approved) but are made in a spirit of independence. These films would not appear at BIFF, for example, but might show later in official venues like Beijing’s Broadway Cinematheque MOMA, where approved “arthouse cinema” (i.e. non-commercial) finds a refuge in Beijing.

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Chinese-language films screening at UT Austin

Sunday, November 6th, 2011

The Department of Radio-Film-Television and the Center for East Asian Studies at the University of Texas at Austin present:

Contemporary Chinese-Language Cinema, Nov 9-13, 2011

with Peggy Hsiung-ping Chiao, distinguished Taiwanese scholar and film producer, alumna and recipient of the 2011-12 William Randolph Hearst Fellow Award from the College of Communication, The University of Texas at Austin

Public Lecture: Chinese-Language Cinema – The New Image
Nov 11 (Fri) 3:30 p.m. – 5 p.m. Legends Room, the Etter-Harbin Alumni Center

Award Ceremony will be held at the end of the lecture and followed by the reception

Master Class: Filmmaking in China: From Art Cinema to Commercial Production
Nov 10 (Thur) 3:30 p.m. – 5 p.m. CMA 4.128

Public Screenings of Films Produced by Peggy Chiao

Buddha Mountain Nov 9 (Wed) 7:30 p.m. CMB Studio 4D (CMB 4.122)
Beijing Bicycle Nov 10 (Thur) 7:30 p.m. ART 1.102

Taiwan Cinema of the 2000s In Celebration of the Founding of the Taiwan Academy

Reception
Nov 11 (Fri) 5 p.m. -7:30 p.m. Legends Room, the Etter-Harbin Alumni Center

Public Screenings of Films Made in Taiwan

7:30 p.m. CMB Studio 4D (CMB 4.122)
Hear Me Nov 11 (Fri)
Blue Gate Crossing Nov 12 (Sat)
Yang Yang Nov 13 (Sun)

Please see the websites below for more details:

http://rtf.utexas.edu/events/contemporary-chinese-language-cinema

http://www.utexas.edu/cola/centers/eastasia/events/19939

Online Videos and Communities Confront Social Disorder in China

Monday, October 31st, 2011

By Maya E. Rudolph

"Disorder" compiles numerous videos capturing social disharmony in China


In an age where surveillance videos serve as a kind of documentary and internet gossip supercedes mainstream news cycles, the idea of tragedy is spun into a new place and time.

Several weeks ago, a surveillance camera in Foshan’s Guangfo Hardware Market captured an incident wherein a small van ran over a two-year-old child left roaming alone in the market. The footage, now viewed by millions on youku and other video-sharing sites, has incited a national uproar and, for many Chinese, something of an identity crisis. The video not only graphically documents the gruesome hit and run, but the footage also reveals the apparent apathy of numerous passersby subsequently ignoring the injured child on the ground. After being hit, two-year-old Yue Yue lay as the passed-over object of little pause by eighteen workers, shoppers, a mother and child, and an additional truck that crushed her feet. Not until a trash-collecting ayi encountered the child was help sought and Yue Yue rushed to a local hospital, where her condition is unknown.

The video’s stark presentation of the hit and run and ensuing parade of indifference is shocking to behold and has now inspired outrage and questioning – of both social responsibility and of an existential, moral depth – on the part of Chinese netizens and beyond. On one hand, the hit and run has unleashed a debate on the ethical fabric of Chinese society, a kind of national “soul-searching” that begs at the emotional “numbing” of Chinese citizens. But the practical concerns of involving oneself in such a loaded situation have also surfaced in defense of the passersby. The threat of court corruption, false accusations, and complicated legal procedures may have deterred those who declined to help the child. In a recent article for The Guardian, Tania Branigan cites a netizen who admitted he’d not have offered assistance if given the opportunity, his pragmatism outweighing popular reactions of pathos and horror:

“Would you be willing to throw your entire family’s savings into the endless whirlpool of accident compensation? Aren’t you afraid of being put into jail as the perpetrator? Have you ever considered that your whole family could lose happiness only because you wanted to be a great soul?’” he wrote.

In the film Disorder, Huang Weikai’s 2009 digital documentary collage, the action splices in and out of crime and punishment, malaise and passion in contemporary Guangzhou. (more…)

What American Indies Can Learn from Their Chinese Counterparts

Thursday, August 18th, 2011

This article by dGenerate’s founder and president Karin Chien was originally published by IndieWire on the blog of independent film producer Ted Hope. This is a revised version of the article with some clarifications in language. Additionally, Karin and dGenerate’s VP of Programming Kevin Lee hand-picked six films as a starter kit for anyone interested in discovering the world of Chinese indie films. Full article and list of films can be found after the break.

———-

Karin Chien

Let me start by making a provocative statement – in my three years of distributing and working with Chinese independent filmmakers, I’ve experienced greater creative freedom than in ten years of producing independent film in the US.

For most of us, Chinese independent cinema is an unknown. A film like Zhang Yimou’s Hero, financed with Chinese state backing, about Chinese empire, and made by a party-line director, is sold here as arthouse fare, distributed byMiramax. Subtitles are enough to qualify a film as “independent cinema” in America.

So let’s begin with a redefinition. The films I work with are made outside the state studio system and without official government authorization. These are films that do not submit scripts or finished products to censorship committees. These are also films that cannot obtain official distribution or official funding in China. These films are often referred to in the West as unauthorized, underground filmmaking. The Chinese filmmakers call it independent cinema.

So how do you make films outside the system in China? (more…)

Tape (Jiao Dai)

Saturday, January 29th, 2011

LI Ning. China, 2010. Documentary, 168 minutes.
Mandarin w/ English subtitles.

“A riveting portrait of an artist’s attempts at expression and conflicts with societal norms.” – Museum of Modern Art

Performance artist Li Ning turns his life into art in this epic work of experimental documentary.

For five grueling years, Li Ning documents his struggle to achieve success as an avant-garde artist while contending with the pressures of modern life in China. He is caught between two families: his wife, son and mother, whom he can barely support; and his enthusiastic but disorganized guerilla dance troupe. Li’s chaotic life becomes inseparable from the act of taping it, as if his experiences can only make sense on screen.

Tape shatters documentary conventions, utilizing a variety of approaches, including guerilla documentary, experimental street video, even CGI. Tape captures a decade’s worth of artistic aspirations and failures, while breaking new ground in individual expression in China. “Li succeeds in revealing his own soul” (Rotterdam International Film Festival).

Director’s Bio:

LI Ning is an avant-garde dancer and performance artist, who made his film debut with the documentary Tape.

Reviews

Select Film Festivals:

WINNER, Silver Digital Award, YunFest Documentary Festival

OFFICIAL SELECTION, MoMA Documentary Fortnight

OFFICIAL SELECTION, International Film Festival Rotterdam

OFFICIAL SELECTION, Jeonju International Film Festival

OFFICIAL SELECTION, Beijing Independent Documentary Film Festival

Trailer:

FORMATS
PRICE
AVAILABILITY
(This title is available in the US only)
DVD (Colleges, Universities, Institutions)
$295
Order Direct
DVD (K-12, Public Libraries, Select Groups) $195
Institutional Download
TBD
Coming Soon
Public Performance Exhibition (NTSC Beta, DVD)

CNEX announces Documentary Call for Entries

Monday, July 12th, 2010

Our friends at CNEX, producers of the prize-winning 1428, have announced an open call for film and TV documentary projects dealing with Chinese topics around the world. Selected participants will attend the CNEX Chinese Doc Forum, held on October 31st and November 1st in Taipei, Taiwan, with the opportunity to receive funding and attract additional support.

Details and application information after the break.

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