Posts Tagged ‘dgenerate’

“Everybody Should Be Watching” – South China Morning Post Profile on dGenerate

Wednesday, March 16th, 2011
By Isabella Tianzi Cai

Oxhide 2 (dir. Liu Jiayin)

“Film distribution is more often driven by profit than a love of movies, but that’s not true of Karin Chien’s dGenerate Films.” The South China Morning Post profiles dGenerate in a March 6, 2011 article, which can be viewed here as a .pdf.

Reporter Richard James Havis distinguishes dGenerate from most other film distributors. At dGenerate, as Havis explains, dGenerate only picks films that they believe “everyone will benefit from seeing.”

More after the break.

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This Weekend, Don’t Miss Seven-Film dGenerate Series at VIZ Cinema in San Francisco

Wednesday, December 1st, 2010

Super, Girls! (dir. Jian Yi)

Press Release from Viz Cinema:

VIZ CINEMA SPOTLIGHTS NEW CHINESE FILM MOVEMENT IN CHINA UNDERGROUND OPENING IN DECEMBER

7 Films Over 3 Days Offer A View of China as Never Seen Before

VIZ Cinema and NEW PEOPLE, in association with dGenerate Films, are proud to present a fascinating series focusing on a new vanguard of Chinese independent filmmakers, whose innovative uses of digital filmmaking deliver provocative insights into the world’s largest nation. The China Underground film series opens Friday, December 3rd and runs through Sunday, December 5th. Tickets and complete details are available at: www.vizcinema.com.

All of the documentary films to be shown at the festival were made outside the official Chinese film system – unauthorized, uncensored, and totally independent. These groundbreaking films introduce a new generation of filmmakers who represent the future of Chinese cinema, using new technology to present a vision of China as never seen before. A wide variety of controversial topics and issues like homosexuality, the role of women in society, the forced relocation of citizens which preceded the 2008 Beijing Olympics, drug use, and the inner workings of Chinese law enforcement, are examined in unflinching detail in these seven films.

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Award-Winning Director Huang Weikai in U.S. Until March – Available for Appearances

Tuesday, November 30th, 2010

Huang Weikai

From now until March 2011, director Huang Weikai will be available for screenings and lectures in the United States. Huang’s latest film Disorder is a groundbreaking work of experimental documentary that has won prizes and screened at festivals around the world. The Atlantic calls it “one of the most mesmerizing films I’ve seen in ages!”

If you are interested in bringing Disorder and Huang Weikai to your institution or university for a screening, Q&A or guest lecture, please contact exhibitions *at* dgeneratefilms *dot* com.

BIOGRAPHY

Huang Weikai was born in 1972 in Guangdong Province, China. He studied Chinese painting for 15 years and graduated from the Chinese Art Department of the Guangzhou Academy of Fine Arts. He used to work as a cinema promoter, art editor, graphic designer, movie script writer and cameraman. Since 2002, he has been directing independent films. His 2009 found-footage documentary, Disorder has been acclaimed as “One of the most mesmerizing films I’ve seen in ages” by Hua Hsu in The Atlantic for its unflinching look at the absurdity and anarchy of urban life in contemporary China.

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China Underground: Seven-Film dGenerate Series at VIZ Cinema in San Francisco, December 3-5

Wednesday, November 17th, 2010

Super, Girls! (dir. Jian Yi)

Press Release from Viz Cinema:

VIZ CINEMA SPOTLIGHTS NEW CHINESE FILM MOVEMENT IN CHINA UNDERGROUND OPENING IN DECEMBER

7 Films Over 3 Days Offer A View of China as Never Seen Before

VIZ Cinema and NEW PEOPLE, in association with dGenerate Films, are proud to present a fascinating series focusing on a new vanguard of Chinese independent filmmakers, whose innovative uses of digital filmmaking deliver provocative insights into the world’s largest nation. The China Underground film series opens Friday, December 3rd and runs through Sunday, December 5th. Tickets and complete details are available at: www.vizcinema.com.

All of the documentary films to be shown at the festival were made outside the official Chinese film system – unauthorized, uncensored, and totally independent. These groundbreaking films introduce a new generation of filmmakers who represent the future of Chinese cinema, using new technology to present a vision of China as never seen before. A wide variety of controversial topics and issues like homosexuality, the role of women in society, the forced relocation of citizens which preceded the 2008 Beijing Olympics, drug use, and the inner workings of Chinese law enforcement, are examined in unflinching detail in these seven films.

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MEET THE FILMMAKERS: Yang Jin at Apple Store Xidan Joy City, Beijing – November 2

Wednesday, October 27th, 2010

Film Director Yang Jin

dGenerate Films and the Apple Store in Beijing continue their ongoing series showcasing China’s newest filmmakers powered by digital technology. Next Tuesday, November 2, acclaimed digital filmmaker Yang Jin will show clips from his films and discuss his creative process.

Yang Jin’s talk is part of the series “Meet the Filmmakers,” a collaboration between the Apple Store in Beijing and dGenerate Films. Digital tools, from digital video cameras to editing software, have placed filmmaking in the hands of the people. This series introduces award-winning directors discuss with the general public how they use digital technology to create their latest movies, attracting worldwide attention and acclaim.

Read news coverage of the inaugural “Meet the Filmmakers” events, and watch video from previous Apple Store talks with filmmakers Cui Zi’en, Jian Yi and Peng Tao.

Corrected: This event will be held at the Apple Store in Xidan Joy City (NOT Sanlitun), Beijing, starting at 7pm.

Address: North Street, Xicheng District, Beijing Xidan Joy City. Phone: 131(8610) 6649-1400

Yang Jin was born in 1982 in Shanxi. In 2000, he enrolled in the Shanxi Film School’s photography program. In 2003, he enrolled in the College of Art And Communication at Beijing Normal University, where he majored in directing. He made a few of documentaries and some short feature films during his time there. Yang’s first film The Black and White Milk Cow (2004) won the Ecumenical Jury Award and FICC Jury/Don Quijote Prize of the International Federation of Film Societies at the 19th Fribourg International Film Festival. His second feature Er Dong screened at the Pusan, Rotterdam and Hong Kong Film Festivals.

dGenerate Titles Now Viewable Online on MUBI

Tuesday, August 31st, 2010

We are proud to announce that ten films from dGenerate’s catalog are now available on MUBI (formerly The Auteurs) for online viewing. The acquisition of these new titles by MUBI marks another milestone in our commitment to bring to audiences the most contemporary award-winning independent films by native Chinese filmmakers, using the newest technology in the market.

MUBI is known for its role in giving film enthusiasts an indispensible resource for learning about cinema, through its online rental service, the MUBI Notebook filled with articles, reviews and festival reports, and its robust virtual community. We are proud that our films are becoming part of this important vehicle for cinema enthusiasts.

Listed below are these new titles on MUBI. One-time viewing on their site is priced at $3.00.

Using

Betelnut

Meishi Street

Crime and Punishment

Er Dong

The Other Half

San Yuan Li

Super, Girls!

Little Moth

Raised from the Dust

Best of the Decade, Taiwanese Style

Thursday, July 8th, 2010

By Isabella Tianzi Cai

Yi Yi (dir. Edward Yang)

Yi Yi (dir. Edward Yang)

The Taiwanese film magazine Fun Screen called on 68 filmmakers, film scholars, film critics, as well as other related film personnel to vote for the 10 best Taiwanese pictures produced in the years between 2000 and 2009. They were inspired by a similar poll conducted by dGenerate Films earlier this year concerning the 10 best Chinese-language films also made in the past decade.

The result of Fun Screen’s poll came close to ours: Yi Yi, which ranked no. 4 in dGenerate Films’ top-10 list, clinched the no. 1 position in Fun Screen’s top-10 list; and Crouching Tiger Hidden Dragon, which ranked no. 9 in our list, came second there. These films were first and second among Taiwanese films in the dGenerate poll.

The introduction of the poll acknowledged the results of the dGenerate poll in inspiring the poll of Taiwanese films: “At Fun Screen, we do not wish to challenge the list, but the list has made us acutely aware of the fact that Taiwanese films still lack a great deal of international recognition.”

As noted by Lin Wenqi, the chief editor of Fun Screen, “the goal of their poll is not about which film ranks higher than another, but is part of an effort to recognize and celebrate local film talent over the past decade. Fun Screen also just recently published 28 special reports with famous Taiwanese film directors over the past 10 years in a book called The Voices from Taiwanese Films.

The results of the Fun Screen poll can be found after the break.

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Indie Filmmakers Featured in Time Out Shanghai

Monday, June 7th, 2010

The newest issue of Time Out Shanghai (English edition) has a five-page cover feature spotlighting the new generation of independent digital filmmakers. The article singles out seven “directors to watch” whom the magazine playfully dubs “The Magnificent Seven:” Ying Liang, Yang Heng, Zhao Liang, Zhao Ye, Zhao Dayong, Liu Jiayin and Wei Tie. All seven are interviewed, as is dGenerate Films’ president Karin Chien.

The feature is not available online, but we’ve secured permission to make it available as a downloadable .pdf on the dGenerate website. You can download the feature here. Thanks to Nicola Davison at Time Out Shanghai.

dGenerate Films is the proud distributor of films from five of the “Magnificent Seven.” Learn more about their films by clicking on the following titles:

Liu Jiayin: Oxhide

Ying Liang: Taking Father Home; The Other Half

Yang Heng: Betelnut

Zhao Liang: Crime and Punishment

Zhao Dayong: Ghost Town


Testimonial Feedback from Swarthmore College

Monday, May 24th, 2010

Kevin Lee (center) with students of Swarthmore College (photo by Shiyin Lin)

Last month dGenerate Films’ Kevin B. Lee gave a presentation and screening to students and faculty at Swarthmore College. Alex Ho, student organizer of the event, provided the following testimonial:

Many thanks for coming to Swarthmore College to speak about the growth in independent Chinese cinema over the past decade and what your company dGenerate Films is doing to help this movement gain greater exposure. Your talk was of great interest to our varied audience, which included film studies and Chinese studies students and faculty as well as the general liberal arts student who attended on a whim.

As an admirer of your work in online film criticism, I was excited to bring to our college your take on what makes this particular moment in film history so groundbreaking and important, given your extensive knowledge of and passion for world cinema. Your talk certainly didn’t disappoint; it was an accessible, sweeping introduction to Chinese cinema and its place in the foreign film market. At the same time, for even those more familiar with Chinese film, your talk was a priceless look into the works of up-and-coming independent filmmakers that most of the film world doesn’t yet seem to have caught on to. You definitely tapped into our school’s affinity for small-scale, relaxed seminars, peppering your talk with interesting anecdotes and seriously considering questions from our audience about the pertinence of the “dGenerate movement” to the general public in the U.S. and China. Thanks also for having an informal dinner with some of our students and letting us pick your brain about a multitude of topics within and outside of Chinese cinema.

Again, it was a pleasure to bring your presentation to Swarthmore. I hope to see your talk reach more and larger college audiences in the future. Certainly, any university interested in covering Chinese film in its curriculum, shouldn’t limit themselves to the well-known Fifth and Sixth Generation, but look also to the less Beijing-centric films that dGenerate Films works to distribute.

Best,

Alex Ho

dGenerate Films organizes presentations and screenings at colleges, museums and other institutions across the country. For more information, please contact info *at* dgeneratefilms *dot* com.

Shelly on Film: An Inside Tour of The Chinese Independent Film Circuit

Monday, August 10th, 2009
The Iberia Center for Contemporary Art, Home of the Chinese Independent Film Archive (Photo courtesy of Iberia Center of Contemporary Art)

The Iberia Center for Contemporary Art, Home of the Chinese Independent Film Archive (Photo courtesy of Iberia Center of Contemporary Art)

By Shelly Kraicer

Whenever I am interviewed about Chinese independent cinema, the question that comes up more often than anything else is “Can these kind of films be shown in China?”

The situation is changing, rapidly, and in substantial ways. The answer used to be “Yes, sort of”. Now, it’s “Yes, most definitely”.

Independent films, i.e. films made outside the government censorship system, can’t be shown in regular commercial movie theatres. When I arrived in Beijing back in 2003, one had to do a bit of investigative work to find screenings; at art galleries, a few bars and cafes, and occasionally on university campuses: all low- to zero-profile events. Now, though, there is, if not exactly a profusion, then something like a blossoming of screening opportunities for “unauthorized” Chinese indie films.

One such event, which I attended in early April, provides a handy opportunity to sketch out a provisional, though hopefully not too superficial overview of the Chinese independent film scene.

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