Posts Tagged ‘fortune teller’

Xu Tong’s FORTUNE TELLER wins NETPAC Award

Monday, December 6th, 2010

Xu Tong accepts the NETPAC award at the Chongqing Independent Film and Video Festival

By Isabella Tianzi Cai

At the 4th Chongqing Independent Film and Video Festival this year, Xu Tong’s Fortune Teller won the NETPAC Award for the Best Feature-length Film. Ten films were nominated for this category; they included Liu Jiayin’s Oxhide 2 (distributed by dGenerate Films) and Qiu Jiongjiong’s Madame.

The 2010 CIFVF was presented in partnership with Network for the Promotion of Asian Cinema (NETPAC), a regional organization formed in 1990 for the recognition and development of Asian films. Over the past two decades, NETPAC has made many valuable contributions to Asian cinema. The institution of the NETPAC Award, for instance, is one of them. As of the present, the NETPAC Award is offered at 28 film festivals in 21 countries. It is stated on their website that “as more Asian films were selected for exhibition for world audiences, a yardstick for quality . . . that matched the competitive spirit fueling the creative urges of young Asian filmmakers” was necessary.

Roughly 130 people came for the screening of Fortune Teller in the 2010 CIFVF and attended the Q&A session with Xu Tong afterwards. CIFVF organizer Ying Liang, whose features Taking Father Home and The Other Half are distributed by dGenerate, was the moderator for the event. (Report in Chinese at Liang You)

MUBI Notebook on Chinese Indie Cinema; Fortune Teller Named Best of Vancouver Film Fest

Friday, November 19th, 2010

Fortune Teller (dir. Xu Tong)

Over at the MUBI Notebook, one of the leading sites for writing on cinema, editor Daniel Kasman offers his report on the 2010 Vancouver International Film Festival, in which he names Xu Tong’s independent documentary Fortune Teller “the best film I saw this year at VIFF.” Fortune Teller was a prize-winner at the 2010 Beijing Independent Documentary Festival, but has yet to premiere in the United States, a fact that we are working to rectify within the near future. Read critic and VIFF programmer Shelly Kraicer’s description of the film, expanded from the VIFF Dragons and Tigers program notes.

Kasman’s report opens into an extended meditation on the historical significance of the current Chinese independent cinema, comparing it to the classic Hollywood productions of the 1930s. Most of his reflections on the topic are reproduced below:

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“The similarity I see between, say, an American film from the 1930s and a independent Chinese film from 2010, like Fortune Teller, a documentary that was the best film I saw this year at VIFF, is the understanding of filmmakers-producers that one’s country has a significant population, a population whose stories should be told and to whom stories about that population should be told.

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Shelly on Film: Deeper Into Dragons and Tigers

Tuesday, October 19th, 2010

By Shelly Kraicer

Rumination (dir. Xu Ruotao)

The 2010 Vancouver International Film Festival (September 30 to October 15) has just concluded. This was my fourth year programming Chinese language films for VIFF’s Dragons and Tigers section for East Asian cinema; this year’s edition featured 43 features and 21 shorts, co-curated by Tony Rayns and myself. I selected 19 features and three shorts: 12 from China, 4 from Hong Kong, 3 from Taiwan, 2 from Malaysia, and one from Singapore. Details of the films from the People’s Republic of China, including comments derived from my catalogue notes for VIFF, can be found below.

Within the D&T section, the Dragons and Tigers Award for Young Cinema, programmed by Tony Rayns, featured 8 films by young, as yet “undiscovered” directors. The jury, comprised of Jia Zhangke, Bong Joon-ho, and Denis Côté, awarded its prize to the Japanese film Good Morning World!, directed by Hirohara Satoru. Two special mentions were awarded: one to the Chinese film Rumination (Fanchu), by Xu Ruotao, and one to Phan Dang Di’s Vietnamese film Don’t Be Afraid B!

As usual, I chose more films from China than from any other territory. I try each year to balance at least two goals in my programming: I want to give VIFF audiences a sense of the increasing variety of Chinese language filmmaking, both in the independent sector, and in commercial genres. At the same time, it has always been VIFF’s policy and my own personal preference to highlight the work of independent young filmmakers working outside of the system of official censorship and distribution (independent tizhiwai films). Indie documentary filmmaking continues to be particularly strong in China, and I could only choose a few examples: it would have been easy to devote the bulk of my 9 feature length film slots to Chinese independent films this year.

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Awards Announced at 7th China Documentary Film Festival

Monday, May 10th, 2010

The 7th China Documentary Film Festival, organized by Fanhall Films, was held May 1-7 in the Songzhuang Art District on the outskirts of Beijing. 11 new documentaries were featured in the competiton, as well as several other films outside of competition and an international section featuring films from Japan, South Korea and Singapore. We will have some commentary on the festival proceedings in the coming days.

The Festival announced its awards for the following films (with citations by the jury in quotes):

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