Posts Tagged ‘moca’

Disorder discussed at Museum of Chinese in America

Monday, August 22nd, 2011

By Isabella Tianzi Cai

Chi-hui Yang (right) and Kevin Lee discuss Disorder with audience at Museum of Chinese in America

Director Huang Weikai’s short film Disorder played in the Museum of Chinese in America (MOCA) in New York City Chinatown last Friday evening, on August 12, 2011. It attracted students and people from the general public alike, who took an interest in contemporary Chinese documentaries. New York-based Chinese-language news source World Journal, the largest of its kind in North America, reported this event in an August 13, 2011 article.

World Journal reporter Du Yizhen writes in the article,”audience members were greatly amused by the scene where pigs loiter around on the Chinese highway.” The black humor of the film enabled western audiences to understand intuitively what is happening in China.

Chi-hui Yang, film scholar and former programmer of the San Francisco Asian American International Film Festival, and dGenerate Films Vice President Kevin Lee stayed with the audience after the film for a discussion. Yang examined how Disorder effectively exposes the problems brought about by China’s rapid economic development, and it depicts a myriad distortions resulted in ordinary people’s characters and dispositions. (more…)

Chicago Critics Crazy over Disorder; Screening at MoCA NYC This Friday

Tuesday, August 9th, 2011

From Chicago to New York City, "Disorder" has film critics dancing in the streets.

This Friday at 7pm, Huang Weikai’s cinematic hurricane Disorder storms back into New York City, screening at the Museum of Chinese in the Americas in Chinatown as part of MoCA’s Chinese Cinema Club. Film programmer, lecturer and writer Chi-hui Yang will be on hand to discuss the film following the screening, with dGenerate’s Kevin B. Lee moderating.

Earlier in the summer, the film screened at the Nightingale in Chicago riding a wave of strong reviews from area critics. Here’s a sampling:

Ray Pride, New City:

Of the 300 or so movies I saw in 2010, partly on the weekly beat but also at festivals and for juries, one entry’s sheer strangeness and immediacy took me more by surprise than any other film or video. The movie’s even more headlong than this paragraph, hyperbole for the hypnotic: Huang Weikai’s fifty-eight-minute “Disorder,” is a black-and-white shot-on-video portrait of urban Guangzhou, but it’s also a sustained fury of delirium. Tossed into a maelstrom of deracinated images from Huang’s native province, we’re left adrift and agog at brief scenes of traffic jams, floods, accidents, police violence, fools winding through lanes of heavy traffic, and so many, many farm animals gone astray. Hot Docs programmer Sean Farnel went beyond considering “Disorder” a “city symphony,” saying it’s set in “Chris Marker-ville,” and Huang’s film is indeed an act of sustained bricolage, essaying contemporary China through a reported 1,000 hours of footage from news shooters with greater-than-average access to strange goings-on, creating an eruptive, hallucinatory landscape, resisting narrative, that is both tactile and otherworldly. It may be the first great film of the twenty-second century.

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MoCA Chinese Cinema Club This Friday: Hou Hsiao Hsien’s Three Times

Wednesday, March 30th, 2011

Three Times (dir. Hou Hsiao-hsien)

This Friday the Chinese Cinema Club continues at the Museum of Chinese in America in New York’s Chinatown. The featured film is Taiwanese master Hou Hsiao Hsien’s acclaimed feature Three Times, starring two of Taiwan’s hottest stars, Hsu Chi and Chang Chen. The film tells three chronologically separate stories of love between May and Chen, set in three years, 1911, 1966, and 2005.

The screening will be followed by discussion with Leo Goldsmith, moderated by Daryl Chin. Leo Goldsmith is co-film editor of The Brooklyn Rail and an editor at Not Coming to a Theater Near You. Daryl Chin is a multimedia artist, critic and curator. He co-founded the Asian-American International Film Festival, was on the Board of Directors of NewFest (The New York Lesbian and Gay Film Festival) and Apparatus Productions.

The Chinese Cinema Club a collaboration between dGenerate Films and Museum of Chinese in America (MOCA), is a movie club screening Chinese and Chinese American films on the first Friday of every other month.

Tickets: $10/adult; $8/student & senior, Free for MOCA member. RSVP to education *at* mocanyc *dot* org.

MoCA Chinese Cinema Club: Take Out Night This Friday

Monday, November 29th, 2010

Take Out (dirs. Sean Baker and Shih-Ching Tsou)

The Chinese Cinema Club, a collaboration between dGenerate Films and Museum of Chinese in America (MOCA), is a movie club screening Chinese and Chinese American films on the first Friday of every other month.

The Club is a first step towards addressing the disappearance of cinemas from Chinatown, and its subsequent lack of public screening options. The aim will be to draw diverse movie-lovers and provide a regular space to gather, watch, discover and interact around cinema.

The series continues this Friday December 3 with Take Out, an acclaimed independent feature shot in New York’s Chinatown. For this evening only, MOCA will be offering advance purchases of a Chinese takeout dinner, to go with the screening. If you would like to participate, please indicate so when you RSVP.

Fri, Dec 3 from 7pm – 9pm

Take Out
2004, 87 min. Directed by Sean Baker and Shih-Ching Tsou

An illegal Chinese immigrant falls behind on payments on an enormous smuggling debt. Ming Ding has only until the end of the day to come up with the money.

Followed by Q&A with the directors, Sean Baker and Shih-Ching Tsou.

Tickets
Movie only: $10/adult; $8/student & senior, Free for MOCA member.

Movie & Takeout: $22/adult; $20/student & senior, $12 for MOCA member.

To purchase tickets, please email education@mocanyc.org or call 212.619.4785.

The Chinese Cinema Club, a collaboration between dGenerate Films and Museum of Chinese in America (MOCA), is a movie club screening Chinese and Chinese American films. The Club leverages MOCA’s downtown space to re-ignite cinema in Chinatown and harness the power of film.

Click here to see upcoming screenings.

Patrick Radden Keefe’s New Yorker article on Fujian-Chinatown Snakeheads

Wednesday, September 29th, 2010

The Snakehead (author: Patrick Radden Keefe)

This Friday dGenerate Films and the Museum of Chinese in American kick off their regular screening series Chinese Cinema Club. The first screening, held at the museum’s Chinatown location, will be Robin Weng‘s Fujian Blue, an exciting indie feature about reckless youths tied to the human smuggling trade in China’s Fujian province.

Joining us in post-screening discussion is Patrick Radden Keefe, author of The Snakehead: An Epic Tale of the Chinatown Underworld and the American Dream. It’s a fascinating book that digs deep into the smuggling of people from China to the US, an illegal practice which by the 1990s grew into a multi-billion dollar industry. Keefe will share his real-life observations of life and crime in Fujian, and also discuss how the “snakeheads” forever changed New York’s Chinatown.

Admission: $10/adult; $8/student & senior, Free for MOCA member. Visit the MoCA website for directions and details.

In 2006, Keefe published an eye-opening article in The New Yorker that eventually led him to write the book. Here’s a key excerpt:

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Chinese Cinema Club Launches This Friday at the MoCA in Chinatown

Monday, September 27th, 2010

The Chinese Cinema Club, a collaboration between dGenerate Films and Museum of Chinese in America (MOCA), is a movie club screening Chinese and Chinese American films on the first Friday of every other month.

The Club is a first step towards addressing the disappearance of cinemas from Chinatown, and its subsequent lack of public screening options. The aim will be to draw diverse movie-lovers and provide a regular space to gather, watch, discover and interact around cinema.

The series kicks off this Friday October 1 with Fujian Blue, Robin Weng’s acclaimed feature about reckless youths dangerously involved with illegal human trafficking in China’s Fujian Province.

Fujian Blue

2007, 87 min. Directed by Robin Weng.

This award-winning debut feature portrays two interweaving stories of youth crime and family crisis shed light on illegal emigration and human trafficking in China’s Fujian province.

Followed by Q&A with Patrick Radden Keefe, author of The Snakehead: An Epic Tale of the Chinatown Underworld and the American Dream, moderated by Kevin Lee, VP of Programming with dGenerate Films.

Admission: $10/adult; $8/student & senior, Free for MOCA member. To purchase tickets, please emaileducation@mocanyc.org.

Purchase tickets to all three screenings for $25!

To RSVP for the event, please visit the Facebook Event Page here.

UPCOMING FILMS:

Take Out
Friday, December 3, 2010, 7pm

2004, 87 min. Directed by Sean Baker and Shih-Ching Tsou
An illegal Chinese immigrant falls behind on payments on an enormous smuggling debt. Ming Ding has only until the end of the day to come up with the money.
Followed by Q&A with the directors, Sean Baker and Shih-Ching Tsou.

Oxhide
February 4, 2011, 7pm

2005, 110 min. Directed by Jiayin Liu

Daily life in an impossibly cramped Beijing apartment takes on epic proportions in this, intimate portrait, with unprecedented access, of a working-class Chinese family.

To find out more about the Chinese Cinema Club, please click here.